Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story
(on a postcard)

Meowpolis



I'm very excited to be a part of Meowpolis, a show of cat art, as is Moose the Cat. The show will open on October 19th at Baltimore's Whole Gallery, which is 405 W. Franklin Street, which is the H&H Building, 3rd Floor. Thanks to Rahne Alexander and Freda Mohr for putting it together.
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The Wonderful Guardian Profile of Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) in the Glory of Its Four-Page Spread

Kate Salter wrote a very nice profile of Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) in the Guardian's Weekend magazine. You can only see the text at the link, but I have scans of the pages now. And if those aren't big enough to read, then you can still read about Nate Jackson, Karen Lillis, Moose the Cat, and Blake Butler on the blog.







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what Is the outside of the moose made of?

If you Google this -- what is the outside of the moose made of? -- this blog is the first hit.
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Guardian Profile

Kate Salter wrote a very nice profile of Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) in the Guardian's weekend magazine.

You can only see the text at the link. The print magazine also has scans of the postcard life stories and photos of Blake Butler, Karen Lillis, Nate Jackson, and Moose the Cat.
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#75 Moose: Feral Cat to House Cat

Moose’s father abandoned him before he was born. His mother took care of him for a few weeks, but then she abandoned him too. He wasn’t given a name for the longest the time. Moose was on his own, which he was fine with, but then he got sick. Then he didn’t feel like he could move anymore. Moose curled up under the bushes next to a house. Luckily, the man noticed him and made noises with his mouth. Moose opened his mouth and tried to meow, but he couldn’t make any noises come out. But that’s how the man knew he was sick. The man took little steps toward Moose and held his hand out to him. Moose was scared but too sick to move, so he let the man catch him. What could Moose do? The next thing Moose remembers is being inside a little cage and the outside moving by too fast. Then Moose remembers being inside a building for the first time in his life. The two people with long coats did things to Moose that he did not like – lifting his tail, putting their fingers in his ears, poking him with needles. Everybody but Moose was surprised by how small Moose was (2 lbs.) because he had such long fur, which everybody admired, and that made him look full-grown. The man took Moose away from the two people and Moose was grateful for that. Every morning for a week after that, the man made noises with his mouth and gave Moose tuna covered with pink sauce in a China dish. That made Moose feel good enough to run through the dry leaves in the bushes next to the house, which was really loud, but Moose was letting everybody know that it was his house. Moose got big enough to catch birds and squirrels. He broke their necks and tore their heads off. He ate nearly everything but the feathers and wings -- or nearly everything but the legs and fluffy tails. Sometimes, he saw his mom crossing the street, but then she was hit by a car and died. Now Moose throws up whenever he has to go anywhere in the car. Eventually, it got cold at night and the man made noises with his mouth and Moose followed him inside the house. Now Moose lives inside the house all the time and he runs up the front stairs and down the back stairs. He watches the birds and the rats from the 3 stories of windows. He could catch them—he could catch anything—if the man would just let him outside.

Moose Between Editing Projects


Moose Doing Yoga
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